Time-window bias in case-control studies statins and lung cancer

Am J Epidemiol ; 3: These biases, regrettably common in pharmacoepidemiology, have been described extensively in different therapeutic areas 1240 — 42 but do not seem to have sufficiently penetrated the fields of diabetes and cancer.

First, comparing the different cohorts, which consisted of second- and third-line treatments, with metformin monotherapy, a first-line treatment, inherently introduces biases related to disease duration and progression that may not be dealt with adequately during analysis.

For time-based, event-based and exposure-based cohort definitions, the bias in the rate ratio resulting from misclassified or excluded immortal time increases proportionately to the duration of immortal time. In many database studies, exposure status during hospitalisations is unknown.

It is estimated that the risk of OAC is increased by approximately 30—fold in persons with BO, 3 and occurs in a small proportion of patients with BO yearly.

As there is no DDD for low-dose aspirin, dose analysis was not performed for use of low-dose aspirin. Second, the a priori risk factors were further selected using a bootstrap stepwise procedure to determine which factors were actually associated with the outcomes of interest.

They are most often a form of differential misclassification bias and should be recognised as they can be generally avoided by appropriate accounting of follow-up time and exposure status in the design and analysis of such studies. Time-Related Biases in Observational Studies.

Use of metformin is not associated with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer: The use of a time-dependent approach had several advantages: However, this inverse association between statin use and mortality may be due to selection bias and immortal-time bias. One approach to minimize this bias is to apply time-lag periods to exclude cancers diagnosed within a specified time period after entry into the cohort.

Problem of immortal time bias in cohort studies: Because the comparison metformin nonuser does not have a prescription date to define time zero, it was assigned the date of the first metformin prescription of its matched user, a date called the index date.

The details of the individual information systems are reported in the appendix. In the UK and in NL, all citizens are registered with a general practitioner GPwho acts as a gatekeeper to secondary and tertiary medical care. The first study used the U.

That exposure was defined as any time during the year follow-up period contributed to compound the effect of this misclassification. By not classifying metformin exposure during follow-up or measuring metformin exposure over different time intervals properly, the resulting analyses produced apparent reductions in risk that were created artificially by the misclassification of metformin exposure.

It is recommended that all cohort studies should be assessed for the presence of immortal time bias using appropriate validity criteria.

The arrows represent the time point where cohort follow-up starts in conducting comparisons: Immortal time bias in observational studies of drug effects Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf.

A case-control approach that properly accounts for time produces a rate ratio of (–)—suggesting no benefit of statins on lung cancer risk.

We show analytically that the magnitude of the bias is proportional to.

Examining Bias in Studies of Statin Treatment and Survival in Patients With Cancer

Metformin and the Risk of Cancer Time-related biases in observational studies. (–) for kidney/renal and pelvic cancers. Finally, no effect of metformin was found on lung cancer incidence (61). Time-window bias in case-control studies: statins and lung cancer.

While this may be an improvement over the breast cancer study, this method is still prone to time-window bias. Length of time in the database simply means that cases and matched controls have been registered in the database for the same amount of time.

Importance Patients with cancer who use statins appear to have a substantially better survival than nonusers in observational studies. However, this inverse association between statin use and mortality may be due to selection bias and immortal-time bias.

Metformin and the Risk of Cancer

Objective To emulate a randomized trial of statin therapy initiation that is free of. A case-control approach that properly accounts for time produces a rate ratio of (–)—suggesting no benefit of statins on lung cancer risk. We show analytically that the magnitude of the bias is proportional to the ratio of the unequal time-window lengths.

A retrospective case-control study demonstrated that statin use was associated with a risk reduction of lung cancer of 55%. 7 It has been argued that the beneficial effect might result from “time-window bias” because different time lengths between cases and controls are used to define time-dependent exposures.

Time-window bias in case-control studies statins and lung cancer
Rated 4/5 based on 44 review
Cholesterol metabolism and colorectal cancers - ScienceDirect